Ragn-Sells introduced oil shale ash valorisation project in Narva-Jõesuu in 2020

On 29 June, the representatives of Ragn-Sells AS met with the representatives of the local government, entrepreneurs and people of Narva-Jõesuu to introduce the idea of a plant based on an innovative oil shale ash valorisation process which will help to significantly reduce the environmental impact of oil shale ash in the future. The company plans to file an application for the initiation of a special spatial plan to the local government soon.

TALTECH Professor Andres Trikkel explains what is the climate positive calcium carbonate obtained from oil shale ash

Synthetic calcium carbonate represents the biggest share of the materials produced from oil shale ash. The food and pharmaceutical sectors are the best examples of industries in which natural calcium carbonate is used. As this material originates from the manufacturing industry, the calcium carbonate produced from the oil shale ash of Ida-Viru County will most probably be used as a filler in the paint, plastic and paper industry.

Materials explained: what are oil shale and oil shale ash?

Oil shale is a black or brown fine-grained sedimentary rock containing kerogen. Oil shale consists of organic matter that has not fully degraded (up to 70%) and various minerals. Organic matter usually consists of kerogen, which is formed from the degradation of algae or bacteria. The quantity of oil shale ash generated in a year is 15 times bigger than the quantity of municipal waste. The use of oil shale generates large quantities of waste products – ash and semi-coke. For example, approximately 5 to 7 million tonnes of ash and a million tonnes of semi-coke is generated in Estonia every year at the current pace, and only a very small amount of it is recovered.

Archimedes supported the oil shale ash research project of Ragn-Sells with 200,000 euros in 2020

The Archimedes Foundation supports the scientific research of the technology required for the treatment of oil shale ashes that environmental company AS Ragn-Sells is currently working on with more than 204,000 euros. The support granted within the scope of the programme Applied Research in Smart Specialisation will be used for the research overseen by Ragn-Sells and carried out by the scientists of TalTech and the University of Tartu, which is aimed at finding the best technological solutions to the valorisation of oil shale ashes.